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Henry St & Grand St citibike station is gone.

Since citibike has no publishing about such changes and since I already called to find out what had happened to the Henry Street & Grand Street station in the Lower East Side (LES) of Manhattan, I'm writing this blog post.

Apparently and according to the representative that answered my call to 1-855-BIKE-311 (although she initially just confirmed the station was removed, dah - without explanation until I insisted) the station was removed due to a nearby construction which should last up to 6 weeks. Damn, goodbye to a convenient early summer for me (that station was in front of my building).

UPDATE:

I also emailed and I was amazed by their hand-wash response:

from:     Jorge Orpinel
to:     customerservice@citibikenyc.com


Where do you publish information on removing stations, the reason and for how long? I'm a member (ID *****) and want to have this information before hand, not just walk to the location and find no station in sight...

from:     Customer Service
to:     Jorge Orpinel


Dear Jorge,

Thank you for contacting NYC Bike Share, operator of Citi Bike.

Citi Bike station locations and all new station installations are subject to DOT approval.

If you would like more information as to why a planned station has not yet been installed, why a station has been relocated, or why a station exists at a particular location, please submit a Community Outreach and Siting form directly to DOT via their online form or by calling 311.

For additional comments or inquiries, please respond to this email. Please sign up for our e-mail list and visit our website regularly for updates.   

Regards,
Alberto A.
Customer Service

NYC Bike Share, LLC (Operator of Citi Bike)
5202 3rd Avenue
Brooklyn, NY, 11220-1707
1-855-BIKE-311 (855-245-3311)
customerservice@citibikenyc.com
www.citibikenyc.com


It seems these guys really want to beat the MTA in poor service and information standards.

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